Last edited by Dajin
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

4 edition of Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera found in the catalog.

Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera

by Siu Leung Li

  • 234 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Hong Kong University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cultural studies,
  • Gender Studies,
  • Opera,
  • Poetry,
  • Performing Arts,
  • China,
  • Sex role,
  • Asia - General,
  • Theater - General,
  • Theater - History & Criticism,
  • Operas, Chinese,
  • Theater

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages200
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9160080M
    ISBN 109622096034
    ISBN 109789622096035

    As cross-dressing performance has traditionally been a part of Chinese opera, it is worthwhile to analyze the gendered aspects of such cross-dressing Author: Anna Tso. Siu Leung Li is the author of Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera ( avg rating, 4 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), Toward a Theory of Dramatic Adapta /5(5).

    Cross-dressing in film has followed a long history of female impersonation on English stage, and made its appearance in the early days of the silent films. Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel brought the tradition from the English music halls when they came to America with Fred Karno's comedy troupe in Both Chaplin and Laurel occasionally dressed as women in their films. The Male Dan In Chinese Opera Essay In the book, Striking Their Own Poses: The History of Cross-Dressing on the Chinese Stage, Chou Hui-ling explains, “In most societies actors live under suspicion because their craft of "not being themselves" is morally slippery, dangerous, and somehow thought to be dishonest.”() The same ideology.

    Staging the World: Chinese Nationalism at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Rebecca E. Karl Limited preview - Cross-Dressing in Chinese 3/5(1). Cantonese opera is one of the grandest of the traditional musical theatres in China. This book investigates the creative process involved in the performance of these operas, in which as many as fifty or sixty singers/actors/dancers and a dozen or more instrumentalists take part. Based on fieldwork in Hong Kong and upon transcription and analysis of the music from live performances, this book.


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Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera by Siu Leung Li Download PDF EPUB FB2

Informed by queer and feminist theories, this book offers a critical and historical reinterpretation of theatrical cross-dressing in Chinese culture embodied in various discourses, Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera book and artifacts from the eighth century to the present time.

The various kinds of interpretive possibilities in the commanding tradition of cross-dressing Chinese opera have yet to be examined in-depth. In order to discuss “mistaken identity” and gender issues as they relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines a wide range of materials, including traditional dramatic Cited by: Book Description: The enchantment of the figure of the "male dan" – female impersonator – remains a residual element in the cultural imagination of many contemporary Chinese societies.

The various kinds of interpretive possibilities in the commanding tradition of cross-dressing Chinese opera have yet to be examined in-depth. The various kinds of interpretive possibilities in the commanding tradition of cross-dressing Chinese opera have yet to be examined in-depth.

In order to discuss “mistaken identity” and gender issues as they relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines a wide range of materials, including traditional dramatic Author: Siu Leung Li.

The various kinds of interpretive possibilities in the commanding tradition of cross-dressing Chinese opera have yet to be examined in-depth.

In order to discuss mistaken identity and gender issues as they relate The enchantment of the figure of the “male dan” — female impersonator — remains a residual element in the cultural /5(4). Read this book on Questia. Informed by queer and feminist theories, this book offers a critical and historical reinterpretation of theatrical cross-dressing in Chinese culture embodied in various discourses, texts and artifacts from the eighth century to the present time.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: x, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm: Contents: 1. Lu Xun's Straight Words and the Queer World of Chinese Opera A Theatre of Cross-Dressing: A Revisionist History A Theatre of Desire: The Concubine and the Hegemon King (Cross-)Dressing Up to Power: Woman Warriors Un/queering.

For a book-length account of cross-dressing in Chinese opera, see Li []. It is interesting to note that while cross-dressing, both male-female and female-male, existed in Chinese operatic.

In order to discuss “mistaken identity” and gender issues as they relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines a wide range of materials, including traditional dramatic texts, modern literary writings, critical writings (for example, quhua), opera paintings, and contemporary : Siu Leung Li.

The various kinds of interpretive possibilities in the commanding tradition of cross-dressing Chinese opera have yet to be examined in-depth. In order to discuss "mistaken identity" and gender issues as they relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines a wide range of materials, including traditional dramatic texts.

88 Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera According to the legends told in traditional drama and fiction,s three generations of the family's men were killed in battle against invading "barbarians"; their widows, who were audacious warrior women, took up their husbands' roles to protect their country and fight against the alien by: E-BOOK EXCERPT.

Born in the grandeur of the Qing dynasty, Peking Opera is known the world over for its lively music, colourful costumes, and thrilling displays of acrobatic prowess. Although reflective of the many changes that have occurred in Chinese society, Peking Opera today retains the drama and action that have charmed generations of.

The various kinds of interpretive possibilities in the commanding tradition of cross-dressing Chinese opera have yet to be examined in-depth. In order to discuss "mistaken identity" and gender issues as they relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines a wide range of materials, including traditional dramatic texts Author: Siu Leung Li.

Cross-dressing Chinese tourist gets women’s day discount after dispute To collect information for the book, we decided to travel across China to. - Buy Cross–Dressing in Chinese Opera book online at best prices in India on Read Cross–Dressing in Chinese Opera book reviews & author details and more at Free delivery on qualified : Siu Leung Li.

Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (p. []) and index. Summary In order to discuss "mistaken identity" and gender issues as they relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines a wide range of materials, including traditional dramatic texts, modern literary writings, critical writings, opera paintings and contemporary movies.

Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera (review) Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera (review) Fu, Ping. Mae Smethurst gives a more literal rendering of the original. Moreover, both Japanese texts are printed at the end of the book, which helps the language student to become familiar with the nö.

Cross-dressing is cited as an abomination in the Bible in the book of Deuteronomy (), which states: "A woman must not wear men’s clothing, nor a man wear women’s clothing, for the Lord your God detests anyone who does this", but as Aquinas noted above this principle was interpreted to be based on context.

In order to discuss “mistaken identity” and gender issues as they relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines a wide range of materials, including traditional dramatic texts, modern literary writings, critical writings (for example, quhua), opera paintings, and contemporary movies.

To discuss "mistaken identity" and gender issues that relate to cross-dressing on the Chinese operatic stage, this book examines traditional dramatic texts, modern literary writings, critical writings, opera paintings, and contemporary : Siu Leung Li. In traditional Chinese opera, cross-dressing is common practice, with male actors performing female roles and vice versa.

Dressing up as the opposite sex often serves as a metaphor for the loss of one’s identity or for gender dysphoria. Frequently, it also carries implications of same-sex romance.Cross-dressing in kunqu, a classical genre of Chinese opera, as artistic and/or queer performance, may be understood through the Chinese aesthetic dyad of se (erotic charm) and yi (performance skill); these concepts complement or challenge international queer theories.

The chapter surveys current debates about kunqu cross-dressing, illustrating with analysis of Author: Joseph Lam.The enchantment of the figure of the "male dan" – female impersonator – remains a residual element in the cultural imagination of many contemporary Chinese societies. The various kinds of interpretive possibilities in the commanding tradition of cross-dressing Chinese opera have yet to be examined in-depth.

In order to discuss "mistaken identity" and gender issues as they relate Cited by: